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Disclaimer : The following list includes academic institutes that offer European degrees or courses in Forensic Anthropology or related fields. This list is not exhaustive, and therefore may not include all the relevant institutes. If you are aware of any omissions, please let us know (contact@forensicanthropology.eu).

FASE has no information on the quality of these courses, and inclusion in the list does not imply that FASE endorse the institute or course.

Austria

Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna

Belgium

Centre de médecine légale de Charleroi

 

Croatia

Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb

University of Zagreb

 

Czech Republic

Department of Anthropology and Human Genetics, Prague

Institutute of Anthropology, Brno

Denmark

Department of Forensic Medicine, Copenhagen

 

France

UMR 7268-ADES, Marseille

Service de Médecine Légale et Droit de la Santé, Université de Lorraine, Nancy

 

Germany

Interdisziplinäre AnthropologieAlbert-Ludwig-University Freiburg

Forensic & Biological Anthropology, University Clinic Freiburg

Institute of Anthropology, Faculty of Biology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz

Anthropology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Biology LM University, München

Greece

Department of Animal and Human biology, National and Kapodistiran University of Athens

 

Italy

LABANOF, Milano

Netherlands

Barge’s Anthropologica Leiden, Leiden University Medical Center

Faculty of Archaeology Leiden, Leiden University

Portugal

Department of Life Science, University of Coimbra

Forensic Sciences Center in Coimbra 

Slovakia

Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava

Spain

Physical and Forensic Anthropology, University of Granada

Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona

University of Complutense, Madrid

Switzerland

Institute of Anthropology, University of Zurich

UK

You find a list of institutes who offer degrees and courses about Human Identification and FA on the website of BAHID (British Association For Human Identification) and BAFA (British Association for Forensic Anthropology).

Forensic Anthropology, The University of Edinburgh

Austria

Austria

The Department of Evolutionary Anthropology at the University of Vienna was founded more than 100 years ago and is the only biologically oriented anthropology at university level in Austria. The department was recently growing significantly by incorporating new workgroups. Thus our portfolio is now covering a broad range of approaches to study the evolution of humans from different perspectives, including the history of their ancestors and closest relatives. The eleven leaders of workgroups are well established in the scientific community and maintain numerous links to research institutions in the world.

Our workgroups cover topics in the field of human evolution from functional morphology, paleogenomics, paleoproteomics, bioinformatics, isotopes, and radiocarbon dating to evolutionary demography, human life history, history of pathogenes, bioarchaeology, human behavioural biology, animal domestication, and human ecology.  

The Department of Evolutionary Anthropology is also at the core of the research network “Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences – HEAS” with the goal to study human biological and cultural evolution together in an interdisciplinary network.

Please use the links for more information about the different research teams and the people involved. Furthermore you will find news and links about the different groups and partners involved.

For students the Teaching and Student Info navigation points provide necessary information about courses, examinas and excursions as well as teaching materials.

Our mission is to advance, increase, and disseminate knowledge about human evolution through research, teaching, publishing, and other forms of outreach to the general public.

Croatia

Croatia

The Institute for Anthropological Research is a public research institute based in Zagreb, Croatia, that carries out scientific, expert and educational activity in the field of anthropology as a medical, natural, biotechnological, social and humanistic science. Researchers at the Institute have different basic education (medical doctors, molecular biologists, archaeologists, social anthropologists, forensic scientists, psychologists, chemists, etc.) and are oriented towards anthropology during their PhD studies or through their research projects. Such diverse profiles of the Institute’s staff allows inter- and multidisciplinarity in designing and implementing research. The Institute possesses rich biobank and human skeletal collections. The Institute’s activities are funded by Croatia’s state budget, and national and international foundations and programmes, such as National Institutes of Health (USA), EU framework programmes for research and innovation, and others. Since its establishment, the Institute has been continuously striving for scientific excellence and global networking, it is connected with top-class leading organizations, and it is open for new collaborations in future projects.

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Czech

Czech Republic

The Department of Anthropology and Human Genetics deals with human biological research of current and past populations. A wide range of research topics ranging from retrospective anthropology to research into the variability of today’s man are solved within the department. The department is further divided into the following research laboratories:

The first two laboratories work with skeletal material and study mainly human morphological variability. The LAKT focuses on the study of functional adaptation in the skeleton, derivation of behaviour in past populations and taphonomic changes to the skeleton. At the same time, the LAKT uses the possibilities of experimental testing of biomechanical models. The L3D uses the methods of virtual anthropology and focuses on retrospective anthropology, as well as on forensic and biomedical research. Questions of craniofacial growth of the current population, including soft tissues, and postoperative development of various congenital malformations with facial malformations are addressed.

Two other workplaces deal with morphological and genetic variability of the current human population. The LBA focuses on postnatal growth and human development in connection with lifestyle changes and their reflection in morphological and functional somatic parameters. The LMA is engaged in the study of molecular genetic aspects of autoimmune and polygenic diseases. In addition, variability in the human genome and the immune response is studied in the workplace.

The department cooperates with other institutions, such as the Institute of Archaeology of CAS, the National Museum, IKEM (Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine), Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Charles University), CTU (Czech Technical University in Prague), Institute of Endocrinology, which are involved in solving research problems, teaching and conducting student work.

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Denmark

Denmark

The Department of Forensic Medicine carries out forensic examinations for the police, the courts and other authorities in Denmark, Greenland and the Faeroe Islands.

Forensic examinations in Denmark are carried out by universities in Copenhagen, Aarhus and Odense. This is to ensure that they are carried out independently of the judiciary and to ensure that they are of high professional and scientific quality.

Forensic examinations are an important factor in many court cases and decisions made by the Danish authorities. 

Organization

The Department of Forensic Medicine is led by Niels Lynnerup, MD, DMSc and is divided into three sections: Section of Forensic Chemistry, Section of Forensic Genetics and Section of Forensic Pathology (which also includes the Laboratory of Forensic Anthropology). Each section undertakes research and teaching in their own fields. 

Section of Forensic Chemistry

Our primary practical duty is to carry out toxicological analyses of biological samples. These samples may consist of blood, urine, hair, and various forms of tissue. We also analyse non-biological materials such as tablets, powders or other objects to determine whether they contain drugs. The section has around 40 employees which includes forensic chemists, PhD students, laboratory technicians, IT developers and secretaries.

Section of Forensic Genetics

The section serves as the national laboratory for DNA analyses in criminal, paternity and family reunion cases commissioned by the police, the judicial system, government authorities, the Danish Immigration Service, etc. It does not perform genealogical analyses for private individuals. The section employs some 100 people, including forensic geneticists, laboratory and secretarial staff and IT developers.

Section of Forensic Pathology

The section handles forensic examinations of the living and dead for the police districts in Eastern Denmark. The forensic examinations of the dead include, among other things, site investigations, medico-legal examinations and autopsies. Examinations of the living are personal examinations of victims and suspected perpetrators. The department also conducts forensic anthropological studies of bones and human remains. The section has approximately 70 employees, including doctors, dentists, forensic anthropologists, secretaries, forensic and laboratory technicians.

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France

France

The Department of Forensic Medicine carries out forensic examinations for the police, the courts and other authorities in Denmark, Greenland and the Faeroe Islands.

Forensic examinations in Denmark are carried out by universities in Copenhagen, Aarhus and Odense. This is to ensure that they are carried out independently of the judiciary and to ensure that they are of high professional and scientific quality.

Forensic examinations are an important factor in many court cases and decisions made by the Danish authorities. 

Organization

The Department of Forensic Medicine is led by Niels Lynnerup, MD, DMSc and is divided into three sections: Section of Forensic Chemistry, Section of Forensic Genetics and Section of Forensic Pathology (which also includes the Laboratory of Forensic Anthropology). Each section undertakes research and teaching in their own fields. 

Section of Forensic Chemistry

Our primary practical duty is to carry out toxicological analyses of biological samples. These samples may consist of blood, urine, hair, and various forms of tissue. We also analyse non-biological materials such as tablets, powders or other objects to determine whether they contain drugs. The section has around 40 employees which includes forensic chemists, PhD students, laboratory technicians, IT developers and secretaries.

Section of Forensic Genetics

The section serves as the national laboratory for DNA analyses in criminal, paternity and family reunion cases commissioned by the police, the judicial system, government authorities, the Danish Immigration Service, etc. It does not perform genealogical analyses for private individuals. The section employs some 100 people, including forensic geneticists, laboratory and secretarial staff and IT developers.

Section of Forensic Pathology

The section handles forensic examinations of the living and dead for the police districts in Eastern Denmark. The forensic examinations of the dead include, among other things, site investigations, medico-legal examinations and autopsies. Examinations of the living are personal examinations of victims and suspected perpetrators. The department also conducts forensic anthropological studies of bones and human remains. The section has approximately 70 employees, including doctors, dentists, forensic anthropologists, secretaries, forensic and laboratory technicians.

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FASE CERTIFIED ANTHROPOLOGISTS

Level II

  • Angela Bessa
  • Dr. Maria Teresa Ferreira
  • Dr. Amanda Hale
  • Mélanie Henriques
  • Mara Karrell
  • Dr. Lóránt Magyar
  • Dr. Calil Makhoul
  • Dr. Dominika Nociarová
  • Dr. Patricia Prado
  • Nicole Prata
  • Dr. Elena Ruiz

Level I

  • Dr. Carmen Simona Ionescu
  • Dr. Elena Kranioti
  • Carlos Palhares Machado
  • Dr. Anja Petaros

Honoris Causa

  • Professor Dr. Eric Baccino
  • Professor Dr. Jean-Pol Beauthier
  • Professor Dame Susan Margaret Black
  • Professor Dr. Miguel Botella
  • Professor Dr. Cristina Cattaneo
  • Professor Dr. Eugénia Cunha
  • Professor Dr. Tzipi Kahana
  • Professor Dr. Phillipe Lefévre
  • Professor Dr. Laurent Martrille
  • Professor Dr. Gerald Quatrehomme
  • Professor Dr. José Luis Prieto Carrero
  • Professor Dr. Ann Ross
  • Professor Dr. Maryna Steyn
  • Professor Dr. Douglas Ubelaker

INFORMATION ABOUT NEXT CERTIFICATION, DATES, VENUE AND FEES.

The deadlines and dates for 2023 are as follows:

– Application: 30 March 2023. Please send the application and full list of required documents to Prof Eugenia Cunha (cunha@ci.uc.pt)

– Shortlist announcement: 1 May 2023

– Theoretical exam: online, 1 June 2023

– Practical examination for individuals who passed the theoretical exam: Tuesday 29 August 2023 in Marseille, France.

A zoom session to clarify questions of the applicants or to provide recommendations on how to prepare for the exam will be scheduled for those that were shortlisted.

Applicants for both levels are welcome. This year it will still be possible to conclude examinations in case of shortlisted candidates who missed the last exam in Milano. Please inform Prof Cunha.

Before being eligible to do the practical exam you have to pass the written exam. If you have failed the written exam you have to retake it in the next examination round in order to continue the examination.

If you failed the station test (practical) you cannot proceed to the oral examination (Level 1). You have to retake the station test on the next examination round.

The candidates that want to retake the exam are welcome to do so and do not need to pay any additional fees, but they need to notify Professor Eugenia Cunha (cunha@ci.uc.pt) if they wish to re-take the exam during the next certification round.

If you have already met the requirements for Level 2 certification, you do not need to retake the theoretical and practical examination (stations test) and will only need to do an additional practical examination (oral examination with two scenarios).

Knowing the diverse education of practicing forensic anthropologists in Europe and other countries, people applying to FASE certification do not need to have a master in forensic anthropology (in some countries there is no possibility to have this type of education). However, they need to have a background that can allow additional education in forensic anthropology (which you also need to prove). The related field taken in consideration are medicine, biology, bioarchaeology. Please not that you need, beside this education, prove that you have additional formal education in forensic anthropology.

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ORAL EXAMINATION WITH TWO CASE SCENARIOS

The practical, oral examination focuses on two case scenarios and must be attended in person as communicated by the examination board.

The applicant needs to analyse two cases in the same way as it is done in his/her practices. The applicant can write notes, use the available literature and resources (that will be made available at the examination) as an aid and then needs to present the results of the analysis to the examination board. The board can request to see the notes and the applicant can be asked to clarify the notes.

During the presentation of the cases the Board has the right to ask additional question that test the theoretical knowledge of the applicant.

PRACTICAL STATION TEST

The practical examination for Level 1 and 2 is a stations-based test and must be completed in person, within a specified time.

The stations can cover this type of cases:

  • Fragmentary remains (identification of bones, siding of bones)
  • Juvenile osteology (age determination, identification of bones)
  • Commingling and MNI
  • Human and non-human bone identification
  • Taphonomy
  • Biological profile: Age-at-death: subadults and adults
  • Biological profile: Biological sex
  • Biological profile: Ancestry /Population affinity
  • Biological profile: Stature
  • Personal identification
  • Anatomical variants
  • Pathology: diseases, ante-mortem trauma
  • Trauma:(ante-, peri-, post-mortem differentiation); mechanisms of trauma (blunt, sharp, gunshot)
  • Burned remains

Where age- and sex-estimation questions related to phases (e.g., Suchey-Brooks) are asked, the ages associated with each phase will be provided. 

Individual aspects of the examination are considered as passed when a candidate achieves a result of 80% or more. The candidates are informed if they have passed the same day of the examination, after the examination board has evaluated the responses of the candidates.

ONLINE THEORETICAL (WRITTEN) EXAMINATION

The theoretical (written) examination takes place online and is in the form of a multichoice choice type of exam.

This examination can be completed from any part of the world, but a stable internet connection is required and always with a limited time to accomplished it in  one hour).

Questions are aimed at being of a more general nature, and not continent-specific, as practitioners from all regions of the world are encouraged to complete the certification process.

The following topics are included:

  • History of forensic anthropology
  • Human osteology including juvenile osteology
  • Human vs. non-human bone. General bone characteristics, including histology
  • Taphonomy
  • Search and Recovery (including documentation)
  • PMI estimation methods
  • Biological profile: Age-at-death: subadults and adults
  • Biological profile: Biological sex
  • Biological profile: Ancestry
  • Biological profile: Stature
  • Personal identification, morphological traits, occupational markers, radiology
  • Pathology: diseases, ante-mortem trauma
  • Trauma (ante-, peri-, post-mortem differentiation); types of trauma (blunt, sharp, gunshot)
  • Nomenclature, report writing, statements, interpretation and conclusions, likelihoods

At the present time, the certification covers the expertise concerning only remains of the deceased, not the assessment of the living.

Individual aspects of the examination are considered as passed when a candidate achieves a result of 80% or more. The exams will be corrected anonymously by the attending members of the certification committee. The results for the written part of the examination will be provided immediately after the exam.

INITIAL EVALUATION- APPLICATION FOR LEVEL II

This level of certification is aimed at candidates who handles skeletal remains and provides assistance to senior personnel. For this level of accreditation, the following documents are required:

  1. Proof of a Masters degree in biological or forensic anthropology or related field such as medicine or forensic archaeology 
  2. Short CV AND a full narrative on the training related to forensic anthropology
  3. Proof of continuing education in forensic anthropology
  4. Proof of assisting with casework
  5. 5. Letter from supervisor supporting the candidate, and attesting to the completed casework

The complete documentation (1-5) should be e-mailed to Prof Eugenia Cunha (cunha@ci.uc.pt) by explicitly putting in the subject of the email FASE certification application. If approved, the candidate will be shortlisted for a practical and theoretical examination.

INITIAL EVALUATION- APPLICATION FOR LEVEL I

This level of certification is aimed at independent medico-legal practitioners in the field of forensic anthropology. For this level of accreditation, the following documents are required:

  1. Proof of a Masters degree in biological or forensic anthropology or related field AND proof of an MD or PhD degree in biological or forensic anthropology or a related field
  2. Short CV AND a full narrative on the training related to forensic anthropology
  3. Proof of continuing education in forensic anthropology, for example workshops or relevant research
  4. Two case reports (translated in English; the cases can be de-identified prior to sending)
  5. List of cases (minimum of 20 forensic anthropology cases as an expert)
  6. Evidence of at least 5 years of experience in case work

The complete documentation (1-6) should be e-mailed to Prof Eugenia Cunha (cunha@ci.uc.pt) by explicitly putting in the subject of the email FASE certification application

If approved, the candidate will be invited for a practical and theoretical examination.

Honoris causa certification

For established practitioners practicing for at least 15 years, certification as honoris causa may be granted based upon their CV, qualifications, academic status, and professional experience.

To be considered for honoris causa, the candidate needs to submit all documents required for Level I certification.

FASE CERTIFICATION

It is recognized worldwide that some form of accreditation is necessary for practicing forensic anthropologists. An international, non-biased and objective certification system is of paramount importance for maintaining high standards for forensic anthropology among practitioners, especially because, at least in Europe, forensic anthropology practitioners have different professional backgrounds and do not always have a formal education/training in forensic anthropology.

The Forensic Anthropology Society of Europe (FASE) offers formal certification for forensic anthropologists, following evaluation, testing and approval by an examinations board. The certification program was introduced in 2014 after several years of intensive discussions and preparations, and is intended mainly to test if practitioners’ knowledge and competence are in line with international standards and enables standardization and best practices among forensic experts. The certification is open to practitioner from all regions of the world.

CERTIFICATION SCHEME

 

FASE offers two levels of certification – Level 2 and Level 1.

 

  • Level 2 is for candidates with sufficient qualifications to handle skeletal remains and who provide assistance to senior personnel.
  • Level 1 is the highest and is aimed at providing certification for independent practitioners. The title gained is C-FASE (certified by FASE).

Certification assessments are scheduled once annually and are usually associated with the annual FASE workshop and symposium.

The certification process is performed in two phases:

 

1) Initial evaluation of a detailed CV and other documents (check the Level 1 and Level 2 Certification sections for more details) to be emailed to Prof E Cunha (cunhae@ci.uc.pt). These will be assessed by the examination board and those that meet the requested criteria will be shortlisted.  It is emphasized that incomplete applications will result in the application not being further considered for evaluation.

2) Once a candidate has passed the initial evaluation, he/she will proceed with the examination.

First the candidate needs to write an online theoretical examination which is in the form of a multichoice exam.

The written exam is same for Level 1 and Level 2 applicants and is considered as passed if a result of 80% or more is achieved.

If passed, the written exam will be followed by an in-person practical assessment in the form of stations with osseous remains to be analysed and interpreted. The practical stations test is the same for Level 1 and Level 2 and is considered as passed if a result of 80% or more is achieved.

Those applying for Level 1, after passing both the written exam and the stations test,  must additionally complete a practical oral examination that will focus on two case scenarios.

Please note, if any of these parts is not passed the participant cannot continue to the next phase of the examination. ´

If the participants passed all the parts of the examination, the overall results and the final decision on the certification status of the candidates will be announced within one week after the examination by email.

PAYMENT

 

A 50 Euro handling and examination fee is payable to FASE (through IALM), with bank details as provided. The fee should be paid before the application deadline and a proof of payment must be sent together with the certification documentation.

All applicants need to be members of FASE prior to applying for certification.

QUERIES

 

Queries about the certification process can be directed to Professor Eugenia Cunha (cunhae@ci.uc.pt).

Before contacting us you can check our FAQ section.

If candidates still have queries after having applied and been shortlisted, they can participate in a Zoom meeting that is organized prior to examination and where examination board member(s) will further clarify the examination process. Please consult FASE webpage to be updated in this regard since the zoom meeting will be announce in there.

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